Posts Tagged ‘Self-publishing’

About the Book

Title: Writing a Business Plan for Writers

Author: Tiffany Shand

Genre: Nonfiction

When you wrote your first book you thought you’d sit back, watch the royalties roll in and start working on your next book, right? Being an author today is so much more than just writing. Writing is a business and has to be treated like one.
In this short ebook I’ll take your through the reasons why you need a business plan, how to write one and the different elements that make up one to help you become a successful author.

 

Author Bio

Tiffany Shand was born in Essex, UK and started writing short stories when she was a child. She has always done writing in one form or another and started writing novels in her early teens. Tiffany loves to read books and discovered her love for fantasy and paranormal romance during this time. She writes both non-fiction and fiction, and love helping writers to build their author platforms. After doing a creative writing course in her early 20s, she is now a freelance writer and professional editor. Tiffany lives in Essex with her two spoiled cats and one very nutty hamster.

 

 

 

Find Tiffany on:

Amazon Link for How To Write A Business Plan

Tiffany’s Website

Tiffany’s blog

Eclipse Editing

Facebook

Twitter

Goodreads

 

Book Excerpts

Excerpt 1

Writers who make a living from their writing are entrepreneurs in their own way, and the one thing they all have in common is that they have direction and know what they’re doing. One of the best ways of doing that is by having a business plan and treating the job of being an author as an actual business. A lot of authors would love to make a living from their writing, but many view writing as an art form rather than an actual business. Many authors struggle and fail to make very much money from their books. This isn’t because they’re bad writers, either they don’t know how to make the money or they don’t have the direction to make a business out of it.

Writers who work for a living are freelancers, teachers or online entrepreneurs who don’t just publish and market books. They treat the entire process as a business and re-purpose the content of their books into multiple different formats such as paperbacks, e-books, audiobooks and courses.

This book is for both writers who would like to make a living from their work and for entrepreneurial writers who plan their businesses around their books. Any entrepreneur has a plan and direction for their business and will see writing as a business.

Whether you dream of six-figure advances, or write because you simply must write, you may not think of writing as a business but just something you love doing.

What is a business plan?

A business plan is an outline of your goals or a statement of the things you want and how you will to get them. It includes an assessment of the goals and how you’ll obtain them.

A good business plan should outline how you plan to learn about the publishing process and how you plan to build up your audience of readers and work with others in the writing community.

The plan I talk about in this book may look very different than one used by a start-up company as it is specifically written for writers and creative entrepreneurs.

Excerpt 2

Why You Need to Treat Writing Like a Business

Writers write books, but in this new world of digital publishing, they have to be a lot more than that. Writers have to be marketers and entrepreneurs. They have to build themselves an author platform, grow their readership, engage on social media, network and so much more.

Writing a book is really only the tip of the iceberg. To be a serious writer you have to treat publishing like a business.

If you become traditionally published, you may think that your publisher will do all the work for you, but that’s very rarely the case. Publishers expect authors to market their own books and build their own platforms. If you don’t have a strong author platform in place, a publisher is unlikely to take much interest in you. It’s harder to get a traditional book publishing deal now, but not impossible. EBooks have provided authors opportunities that have never been open to them before.

If you decide to self-publish your books you are essentially your own publisher. Publishing is a business and has to be treated as such. You have to sort out things such as editing, formatting, cover design and marketing.

Although you can do some of these things yourself, some of it does have to be outsourced and like any business that takes time and money. Being a writer isn’t an easy business.

From the moment you decide to publish your book, you became your own business. That’s right a business. Most writers just think they’re writing when they write their book – I used to think the same thing. They don’t think of it as the product it is.

I’m a writer first and foremost, but I also have to be a lot of other things.

Yes, it takes a lot of work to publish books well and get some profit out of it. But it’s also a very exciting and rewarding job.

 

Excerpt 3

It’s best to start writing your business plan as soon as you decide that you want to publish books.

I didn’t start writing my own business plan until after I’d published two novels.

What do you want to write?

So you want to be a writer? That’s great news, but where do you start?

One of the most important steps on your journey to write a business plan is deciding what you actually want to write. This may seem obvious, maybe you want to write romance, thrillers and more.

Another important thing to decide is what you want to get out of your writing.

  • Do you want to earn a living from your writing? If so, how much do you want to earn each month or year? This will vary from person to person.
  • Do you want to write novels or short stories?
  • Do you want to write and run a profitable blog?
  • Do you want to write a blog and turn your posts into a book?
  • Do you want to be a freelance writer writing for magazines or online publications?
  • Do you want to write fiction? If so, what kind of fiction? Fantasy, romance, crime, sci-fi?
  • Do you want to write non-fiction? Such as business or self-help books?
  • Do you want to become a New York Times bestselling author?
  • Do you want to edit books too?

Once you’ve figured out those questions, here are some very important questions to ask yourself:

  • Who is your target audience? Who will read your books? Who is your ideal reader?
  • Do you want to traditionally publish your book or self-publish it?
  • Do you have enough knowledge to make your writing into a career? If you don’t, are you willing to learn?

Once you’ve figured out these questions it will help you figure out on how you how you will work as a writer. We’ll be covering some of those questions in more depth later in the book.

The most popular things I have heard in answer to those questions from other authors are making money or becoming famous. Making money is doable, but becoming famous is a lot harder.

Having your own business plan will help you achieve your goals and more. Even if you only plan to write part-time to make passive income, you still need a plan.

 

 


Public Relations & Marketing

Date Published: 03/10/2015

Publisher: Library Tales Publishing

Radio Programming and Branding: The Ultimate Podcasting and Radio Branding Guide is designed to offer techniques for broadcasters, radio bloggers, radio entrepreneurs and students who wish to start and run their own radio show or station. This book will help you improve your craft and effectively develop a winning brand that attracts attention, followership, and, ultimately, advertisers.


Author Bio

Gary Begin, the founder and president of Sound Advantage Media, a radio programming consulting firm, possesses over thirty years of radio programming experience. Begin’s programming and on-air experiences have included diverse markets such as Tampa and Sarasota, FL, Providence, RI, Saginaw, MI, Hagerstown, MD, Columbus, GA, Portland and Waterville, ME.  Begin attended Dean College in Franklin, MA and has continued to enhance his skills with regular attendance at many programming seminars. In addition to Sound Advantage Media, Begin also owns Gary Begin Voice Talent, providing voice talent services for clients all across the United States. 

 

Contact Information

Website: www.librarytalespublishing.com/radio-programming-and-branding/

 

Purchase Links

Amazon: CLICK HERE to go to Amazon

 

 

About the Book

Title: Short Story Pro Market 2017

Author: TC Michael

Genre: Nonfiction Reference / Guidebook

Short Story Pro Market is a reference book created to assist you in the publication process of your short stories. It will help guide you in finding a publisher by providing you with the necessary information needed. There are over 150 publishers listed inside. Think of this book as a “tool”, one you can constantly look back on with any questions you may have. This book is designed to provide as detailed information about each publisher as possible, as long as the information is necessary in submitting to a given publisher.

As indicated by the title, this book contains ONLY professional paying markets, which have been verified by their websites and other online information.

Short Story Pro Market provides authors a huge head start in finding a publisher by helping you avoid agonizing over countless grueling hours of online searches, comparisons, queries, and complications. You save precious time by having everything in one place from publisher names and websites to the accepted document format. It’s all inside.

 

Author Bio

TC Michael was born and raised in small town USA where he grew up with a large family. He’s always been an epic daydreamer with a wild imagination. He currently lives in northern Utah where he’s working on his next great novel and enjoying life. When he’s not writing, he’s hanging out with family, reading, or enjoying the outdoors. TC has wanted to be an author his whole life, but never thought it would happen. Now, he is working hard on making his dream come true.

 


Links

Website: (https://tcmichael.com)

Book Information Page (on website): (https://tcmichael.com/short-story-pro-market-2017/)

Facebook: (https://www.facebook.com/author.tcmichael)

Twitter: (https://twitter.com/AuthorTCMichael)

Goodreads: (https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7035740.T_C_Michael)

Amazon Book Page:  (https://www.amazon.com/Short-Story-Pro-Market-2017-ebook/dp/B01N6WZJP3/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1489626998&sr=8-1&keywords=short+story+pro+market+2017)

 


Book Excerpts

  1. Short Story Pro Market is a reference book created to assist you in the publication process of your short stories. It will help guide you in finding a publisher by providing you with the necessary information needed. There are over 150 publishers listed inside. Think of this book as a “tool”, one you can constantly look back on with any questions you may have. This book is designed to provide as detailed information about each publisher as possible, as long as the information is necessary in submitting to a given publisher.

Inside you will find a breakdown of information by genre. Within each genre you will find a list of professional paying short story markets in alphabetical order. Under every publisher, there will be a series of requirements and requests made by the publisher. This is where the details come in handy to you; these are the stipulations the publishers want you to adhere to before they consider your work. Many publishers are lenient, and occasionally accept things outside of what is listed, but, for the most part, keep within the boundaries. Also, you will notice some publishers are listed under multiple genres. This is because those publishers accept several genres.

As indicated by the title, this book contains ONLY professional paying markets, which have been verified by their websites and other online information. All publishers listed will publish short stories; however, there are a few that may publish novellas, flash fiction, articles, and poetry. The payment rate on those may be different and may not fall under the professional paying category. Publishers listed are primarily English speaking publishers and want English rights. This includes, but is not limited to: North American, Canadian, Australian, UK, European, etc.

  1. This reference guide differs from other popular guides in several ways. First and foremost, this book is narrowed down specifically for short story writers who only want to submit to publishers who pay a professional rate. This means that lower paying markets are not listed. Writers should always submit to the best and highest paying publishers first. Short Story Pro Market is written to be short, because I do not list novel publishers, poetry publishers, specific trade journals, contests or literary agencies. It is organized for short story publishers only. Also, you will not find writing tips, author brand information, promotional material, etc. This makes it easier for you to get straight to the submissions without being bogged down by extra information, which is often unnecessary in short story submissions. Due to this book being short and directly to the point, it is cheaper than competitors’ guides.

Inside you will find SFWA (Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America), MWA (Mystery Writers of America), and other pro publishers outside of these group. Some publishers are working on becoming part of an organization but haven’t reached all the requirements yet. If the publisher listed is part of an organization, it will be mentioned under the publisher’s information.

  1. Short Story Pro Market provides authors a huge head start in finding a publisher by helping you avoid agonizing over countless grueling hours of online searches, comparisons, queries, and complications. You save precious time by having everything in one place from publisher names and websites to the accepted document format. It’s all inside.

This book has a caveat to the pay scale, and thus limits the list to only the publishers that follow it. That is every publisher must pay their authors at least six cents a word or forty dollars a page. Both numbers exist because some publishers, or more specifically genres, may prefer one method or the other. Also, some publishers may not pay over a certain capped word count, so pay attention to that detail, but if available, it will be listed under the publisher.