Posts Tagged ‘writer’

 

Book Details:

Book Title: The Art of Taking It Easy by Dr. Brian King
Category:  Adult Non-Fiction (18+)
Genre:  Literary/Self-Help/Humor
Publisher:  Apollo Publishers
Release date:  October 2019
Content Rating: PG-13+


Book Description:

Psychologist and Comedian King explores the science behind stress in this witty, informed guide. The author uses a bevy of running jokes and punch lines to enliven technical explanations for how and why people experience stress. His metaphors of coming across a bear in the wild as well as being stuck in traffic are also used to great effect to explain a variety of stress responses, such as perceiving a threat and feelings of powerlessness. Reframing thoughts plays a large role in King’s advice: Stress is simply a reaction to a perception of threat being able to consciously redirect choices made by other areas of the brain is the key to living a less stressful existence. He also provides breathing exercises, plants for painting physical health and useful advice for setting attainable goals. King’s enjoyable guide to living with less will be of help to any anxious reader.

Book Excerpt:

Having Goals And Making Plans (pages 87 – 90) 

Art of Taking It Easy: How To Cope With Bears, Traffic, And The Rest Of Life’s Stressors

 

By Dr. Brian King

 

As long as I can remember, I have always been less affected by stress than those around me. I remember keeping calm in cars full of screaming kids, not getting worked up over setbacks, and just keeping my cool in situations that others seemed to lose it. I remember first learning the definition of “lackadaisical” when a teacher used it to describe my apparent lack of worry about something that was most likely, really, really important. For what it was worth, I always seemed to share my outlook with others whenever possible.

For example, when I was in college at the University of Texas at Austin I went to the campus store to buy a new computer. Upon learning my name, the student technician that was assisting me said “Brian King? I once worked with a guy named Brian King.” We figured out that at one point a few years earlier, we were both working at the same Taco Bell location. I didn’t remember him, but he clearly knew who I was.

Have you ever worked fast food? I spent my first few years out of high school working wherever I could. I stuffed tacos and burritos, flipped and flame-broiled burgers, I even cooked and delivered pizzas. Generally speaking, fast food can be extremely stressful. The pace is relentless, there is almost always a line of customers inside the store and in drive- through and all expect fast service. When things slowed down, management pressured us to look busy even if we weren’t. It was not unusual for me to be pushing a broom across a perfectly clean floor because there was literally nothing else to do. Not to mention that all of this activity was typically carried out in a steamy hot kitchen while wearing some form of polyester uniform. I made $3.35 an hour and was grateful for it. Not a lot of doors swing wide open for high school dropouts. I worked with an interesting assortment of retirees, ex- convicts, current convicts on work release, or general unemployables and occasionally there was a high school or college student. The computer technician was one of those students.

As he was going over the details of my new computer, the technician told me that the reason he remembered my name was because of something I had said to him. One day, during a particularly tough shift he was feeling a bit overwhelmed balancing work with school. Apparently, I said something like “Don’t worry about it, it is just Taco Bell” and reminded him to keep his eyes on the bigger picture, like that sweet student technician job waiting for him in the near future. Honestly, I have no idea what I said to him after “it’s just Taco Bell” but whatever I said worked and stuck in this guys head long enough that he thanked me for my advice years later.

Yeah, those jobs were stressful. School was stressful. Hell, life was stressful. At one point during this period of my life, I was essentially homeless. I slept bottom bunk with my best friend above me at his family’s trailer in the country. The few belongings I had were stored in another friend’s garage. I worked a series of low-wage jobs and

took classes at the community college, but I never let it get to me. I find it funny that when I meet people now, they know me as an educated comedian/speaker with a loving partner and an incredible kid. When I talk about handling stress, it’s because I have handled some stress.

This is how resilient people approach life, and the problems they encounter they see their problems or adverse events as temporary and or solvable. That was definitely the case for me in my early college years, I felt that my situation was temporary and under control. And it WAS!


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About the Author:

DR. BRIAN KING trained as a neuroscientist and psychologist and for the past decade has traveled the world as a comedian and public speaker. By day he conducts seminars, attended by thousands of people each year around the US and internationally, on positive psychology, the health benefits of humor, and stress management. By night he practices what he teaches in comedy clubs, and is the founder and producer of the highly reviewed Wharf Room comedy show in San Francisco. Dr. Brian holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a master’s degree from the University of New Orleans, and a PhD in neuroscience from Bowling Green State University. Hailing from New York and living in dozens of cities throughout the US as the child of a military family, today spends his life on the road with his partner, Sarah, and their young daughter.
 

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The Wedding Crasher

by Nikki Stern

The Wedding Crasher by Nikki Stern

Synopsis:

A brunette in a bridal gown turns up in Pickett County, Tennessee, throat slit and ring finger missing. She’s the latest victim of the Wedding Crasher, a serial killer who murders women just weeks before their weddings. Samantha Tate is Picket County’s yoga-loving, poker-playing new sheriff, a former Nashville homicide detective who struggles with her inner demons. To catch the meticulous murderer, Sam will have to follow her instincts and ignore her worst impulses. Can she stop the Wedding Crasher before another bride-to-be dies?

Book Details:

Genre: Mystery Published by: Ruthenia Press Publication Date: May 8, 2019 Number of Pages: 340 ISBN: 978-0-9995487-3-8 Purchase Links: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Goodreads

Read an excerpt:

The dead woman lay in the clearing like a macabre version of Sleeping Beauty. She was dressed in a long-sleeved, high-necked ivory gown, set off by luminescent pearl drop earrings and a matching necklace that almost hid the dried blood around her throat. Her head rested on a satin pillow, her silky walnut hair spread behind her like a fan. The right hand held a bouquet of wilted flowers and rested on her chest underneath the left, absent the fourth finger. The ring finger. Sheriff Sam Tate stood to one side of the grim tableau, arms folded, and took it all in: the victim; the tall white-haired man who knelt by the body; the deputy who walked the scene in throwaway boots, snapping pictures; the pale young man in running gear sitting on a rock, head almost to his knees; the uniformed officer who squatted beside him. Sam had dressed in her standard uniform of pressed black slacks and a spotless white shirt. A shaft of early-morning sun bounced off the polished badge at her left breast pocket. On her right wrist, she wore a utilitarian watch. Three small studs twinkled along one earlobe, her single visible concession to a rebellious streak. She’d pulled her unruly dark locks into a tight braid. Ray-Bans shielded her green eyes, though not the line that formed between her brows. One of the victim’s low-heeled white pumps had dropped off to reveal a slim ankle in hosiery. Stockings, not pantyhose, held up by an old-fashioned garter. Sam didn’t need to look. He’s back, she thought, adding a curse for good measure. *** Excerpt from The Wedding Crasher by Nikki Stern. Copyright 2019 by Nikki Stern. Reproduced with permission from Nikki Stern. All rights reserved.
   

Author Bio:

Nikki Stern Nikki Stern is the author of the inspirational HOPE IN SMALL DOSES, a 2015 Eric Hoffer Montaigne Medal finalist, and the thriller THE FORMER ASSASSIN, a 2018 Kindle Book Review category finalist. Her essays are included in three anthologies and she co-authored the interactive Café Noir murder mystery series, published by Samuel French. Eight of her short stories have been published in various online journals and she was a Mark Twain Royal Nonesuch finalist for her short story “Long Away and Far Ago.” Nikki is a member of Sisters in Crime and Mystery Writers of America.

Catch Up With Nikki Stern On: nikkistern.com, Goodreads, BookBub, Twitter, & Facebook!

     

Enter To Win!:

This is a rafflecopter giveaway hosted by Partners in Crime Virtual Book Tours for Nikki Stern. There will be 2 winners of one (1) Amazon.com Gift Card each. The giveaway begins on June 1, 2019 and runs through July 2, 2019. Void where prohibited.
CLICK HERE for the Rafflecopter giveaway  

Get More Great Reads at Partners In Crime Virtual Book Tours

“Heartbreaking, hilarious, emotionally raw, and still packed with suspense on every page… a laughthrough-
your-tears kind of novel.”
— Katherine Taylor, author of Valley Fever and Rules for Saying Goodbye

“Smart, funny, and deeply moving, Half the Child offers a fresh and refreshing take on the perils of
parenthood and the healing of damaged families.”
— Judith Stone, author of When She Was White: The True Story of a Family Divided By Race

A Novel

William J. McGee

* Semi-finalist, James Jones First Novel Competition

* Semi-finalist, William Faulkner Creative Writing Competition

HALF THE CHILD takes place over four consecutive summers in the lives of Michael Mullen and his son Benjamin, who ages from 2 to 5. Mike is an air traffic controller at New York City’s LaGuardia Airport who also is pursuing a graduate degree in Psychology. He and Ben’s mother are about to divorce, and the legal stakes keep dramatically increasing, ultimately culminating in abduction. The battle for Ben negatively affects Mike’s career, education, financial state, friendships, romantic life, physical health, and emotional well-being. Refusing to relinquish his parental rights leads Mike to personal bankruptcy, temporary homelessness, potentially catastrophic errors at work, and suicidal depression. Yet he steadfastly refuses to consider a life that consists of living apart from his son. With courts continually ruling against Ben’s father, it remains uncertain if their bond will survive. Ultimately, they will write their own love story.

 

Acclaimed debut novel explores custody, child abduction, and parental alienation — from a devoted dad’s perspective

William J. McGee, author of HALF THE CHILD, received an MFA in Fiction from
Columbia University and has taught undergraduate and graduate Creative Writing at
Hofstra University. An award-winning nonfiction writer as well, McGee is the author of
Attention All Passengers (HarperCollins, 2012), an exposé of the airline industry. He’s
following that up with AirFear, a scripted television drama now in development. McGee
has worked in airline flight operations management at LaGuardia Airport and served in
the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary. He is a native of Queens, where most of the novel is set.
McGee now lives in Connecticut, where he is working on another novel. He is also a
devoted father.

Follow or contact him on Facebook, Twitter, or his website.

“An irresistible page-turner but at the same time thoughtful, precise, and wise in its observations…It may
be the best novel I’ve ever read about a father’s love.”
— Tom De Haven, author of It’s Superman! and the Derby Dugan Trilogy

Contact:
Les Luchter
LL Communications
les@llcom.biz
646-591-5722

Published by: CreateSpace
ISBN-13: 978-0692145340 (William J. McGee)
ISBN-10: 0692145346
Available on Amazon: July, 2018
$15.95 trade paperback
$2.99 Kindle

 

 


Guest Post

DEMOGRAPHIC OF ONE

Are book publishing experts wrong?

William J. McGee

My new novel HALF THE CHILD is all about love and devotion and family and relationships. But you are going to hate it.

I have been told—repeatedly, vociferously, unequivocally—that men neither buy nor read books. As for women, they neither buy nor read books that feature a male narrator, even one like mine who is a loving, caring father making extreme sacrifices for the child he adores. And young adults, well, they have their own marketing silo. So when you take away men, women, and young adults, you’ve sort of knocked the hell out of a potential audience for an adult literary novel.

HALF THE CHILD is a tale of custody and abduction, and details a young father’s desperate fight to prevent soulless courts from driving him out of his beloved son’s life, while he also struggles to keep his high-stress job as an air traffic controller at New York’s LaGuardia Airport. You may like it. You may not. But those who are expressing admiration for the book so far represent every possible demographic.

At one point in the novel our narrator Michael is accused—falsely, it should be stressed—of having a temper issue and is forced to attend an anger management session with truly angry men, where it is woefully and comically apparent he doesn’t belong. And he sums it up thusly: “One more venue in which I don’t quite fit. I’ve never felt so alone. It’s as though I’m a demographic of one.”

I feel strongly that we need more diversity in book publishing, so we can hear more voices, representing more points of view, telling stories that haven’t been told. New voices are now being heard, in print and elsewhere, and I loudly celebrate it. And just as television, radio, and film are being remade by new channels and new independent artists, so too is this necessary in book publishing. None of us can be categorized in the way some literary agents and book editors think we can be.

So please don’t tell me what books I am likely to read, and please don’t tell me who exactly will or will not read my book. I’m not the summation of what I buy, where I travel, or how I vote. As Walt Whitman asserted:

Do I contradict myself?

Very well then I contradict myself,

(I am large, I contain multitudes.)

I suspect you contradict yourself too. In fact, each of us is our own demographic of one. And like Whitman, each of us sings a Song of Myself. Let our voices be heard.

—William J. McGee is the author of HALF THE CHILD, available in print and Kindle on Amazon.