Posts Tagged ‘non fiction’

 

Book Details:

Book Title: The Art of Taking It Easy by Dr. Brian King
Category:  Adult Non-Fiction (18+)
Genre:  Literary/Self-Help/Humor
Publisher:  Apollo Publishers
Release date:  October 2019
Content Rating: PG-13+


Book Description:

Psychologist and Comedian King explores the science behind stress in this witty, informed guide. The author uses a bevy of running jokes and punch lines to enliven technical explanations for how and why people experience stress. His metaphors of coming across a bear in the wild as well as being stuck in traffic are also used to great effect to explain a variety of stress responses, such as perceiving a threat and feelings of powerlessness. Reframing thoughts plays a large role in King’s advice: Stress is simply a reaction to a perception of threat being able to consciously redirect choices made by other areas of the brain is the key to living a less stressful existence. He also provides breathing exercises, plants for painting physical health and useful advice for setting attainable goals. King’s enjoyable guide to living with less will be of help to any anxious reader.

Book Excerpt:

Having Goals And Making Plans (pages 87 – 90) 

Art of Taking It Easy: How To Cope With Bears, Traffic, And The Rest Of Life’s Stressors

 

By Dr. Brian King

 

As long as I can remember, I have always been less affected by stress than those around me. I remember keeping calm in cars full of screaming kids, not getting worked up over setbacks, and just keeping my cool in situations that others seemed to lose it. I remember first learning the definition of “lackadaisical” when a teacher used it to describe my apparent lack of worry about something that was most likely, really, really important. For what it was worth, I always seemed to share my outlook with others whenever possible.

For example, when I was in college at the University of Texas at Austin I went to the campus store to buy a new computer. Upon learning my name, the student technician that was assisting me said “Brian King? I once worked with a guy named Brian King.” We figured out that at one point a few years earlier, we were both working at the same Taco Bell location. I didn’t remember him, but he clearly knew who I was.

Have you ever worked fast food? I spent my first few years out of high school working wherever I could. I stuffed tacos and burritos, flipped and flame-broiled burgers, I even cooked and delivered pizzas. Generally speaking, fast food can be extremely stressful. The pace is relentless, there is almost always a line of customers inside the store and in drive- through and all expect fast service. When things slowed down, management pressured us to look busy even if we weren’t. It was not unusual for me to be pushing a broom across a perfectly clean floor because there was literally nothing else to do. Not to mention that all of this activity was typically carried out in a steamy hot kitchen while wearing some form of polyester uniform. I made $3.35 an hour and was grateful for it. Not a lot of doors swing wide open for high school dropouts. I worked with an interesting assortment of retirees, ex- convicts, current convicts on work release, or general unemployables and occasionally there was a high school or college student. The computer technician was one of those students.

As he was going over the details of my new computer, the technician told me that the reason he remembered my name was because of something I had said to him. One day, during a particularly tough shift he was feeling a bit overwhelmed balancing work with school. Apparently, I said something like “Don’t worry about it, it is just Taco Bell” and reminded him to keep his eyes on the bigger picture, like that sweet student technician job waiting for him in the near future. Honestly, I have no idea what I said to him after “it’s just Taco Bell” but whatever I said worked and stuck in this guys head long enough that he thanked me for my advice years later.

Yeah, those jobs were stressful. School was stressful. Hell, life was stressful. At one point during this period of my life, I was essentially homeless. I slept bottom bunk with my best friend above me at his family’s trailer in the country. The few belongings I had were stored in another friend’s garage. I worked a series of low-wage jobs and

took classes at the community college, but I never let it get to me. I find it funny that when I meet people now, they know me as an educated comedian/speaker with a loving partner and an incredible kid. When I talk about handling stress, it’s because I have handled some stress.

This is how resilient people approach life, and the problems they encounter they see their problems or adverse events as temporary and or solvable. That was definitely the case for me in my early college years, I felt that my situation was temporary and under control. And it WAS!


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About the Author:

DR. BRIAN KING trained as a neuroscientist and psychologist and for the past decade has traveled the world as a comedian and public speaker. By day he conducts seminars, attended by thousands of people each year around the US and internationally, on positive psychology, the health benefits of humor, and stress management. By night he practices what he teaches in comedy clubs, and is the founder and producer of the highly reviewed Wharf Room comedy show in San Francisco. Dr. Brian holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a master’s degree from the University of New Orleans, and a PhD in neuroscience from Bowling Green State University. Hailing from New York and living in dozens of cities throughout the US as the child of a military family, today spends his life on the road with his partner, Sarah, and their young daughter.
 

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Book Details:

Book Title: Claire’s Dad: How I Earned the Title by Shad Arnold
Category: Adult Non-Fiction, 132 pages
Genre: Self-help, Parenting
Publisher: Pinpoint Innovation
Release date: February 1, 2018
Tour dates: Aug 20 to 31, 2018
Content Rating: G

Book Description:

Like everything worthwhile in this world, the title of “dad” isn’t given—it’s earned.

Society hasn’t done a great job preparing men to raise daughters. That’s a shame, as daughters have a deep, often unacknowledged need for their fathers to take an active role in their growth.

In Claire’s Dad, author and father Shad Arnold offers an engaging look at the difference a father can make in his little girl’s life as she grows into a mature, responsible, and self-assured young woman. Using his own experiences as a touchstone, Arnold explores the principles and standards a father can model for his daughter.

The author is donating a portion of the sales of this book to aid children around the world via the Novitas Foundation.

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Meet the Author:

 

Shad Arnold is an author, entrepreneur, inventor, strategic consultant, public speaker and humanitarian who has founded three companies and two non-profit charities. He has worked as a volunteer and advocate for children for over 30 years. He currently serves as the International Executive Director of Novitas Foundation, the charitable organization he founded in 2013, volunteering his time to raise funds and directly oversee relief and sustainable development initiatives to benefit children in need around the world. Visit www.NovitasFoundation.org or www.ShadArnold.com for more information.

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Our currently unsettling political environment fails to address urgent issues. This trend, unless reversed, will lead us to an impoverished future. Technology can either help all to thrive, or deprive most of their livelihoods.

Despite low unemployment, more than one in eight Americans lived in poverty in 2017.  Workers’ wages remain stagnant as the wealthiest prosper. Today’s best paying jobs are in technology companies that produce their products with far fewer workers than did yesterday’s factories.

In as few as ten years advances in artificial intelligence and robotics could eliminate jobs for all but the most highly trained. Now, once bustling factory towns, produce little besides poverty and opioid addiction. What will their future hold?

Our economic system fails to serve hard-working people whose anguish is muffled by a distracting Washington circus. How did this happen? Can we avoid calamity and restore the values that built our republic?

We Can Fix It: Reclaiming the American Dreamexamines the idea that the United States is founded on a vision of opportunities for all ambitious enough to pursue them. Much has changed since the days when land was readily available to farm and men could easily engage in their trades. In the early 1900s, Theodore Roosevelt and those who followed him stood up against monopolies and promoted workers’ concerns.

During the middle decades of the twentieth century, strong unions and high progressive taxes helped build a sturdy middle class. Today that middle class is endangered as the top 20 percent of Americans own nearly 90 percent of American wealth. Some economists predict that already extreme income inequality will be exacerbated by the the tax law passed in December 2017. Others predict that such an unequal economy cannot sustain itself. V. O. Diedlaff’s short book provides an overview of the problems facing Americans in the near future and offers possible solutions.

The eBook is currently free from Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and others. The introductory priced paperback edition is available at Amazon. The Kindle edition is available for pre-order before its summer release.

Discover more at V. O. Diedlaff’s website: http://diedlaffing.blogspot.com/