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Road To Nowhere by Cy Wyss Banner

 

 

Road To Nowhere

by Cy Wyss

on Tour September 1-30, 2019

 

Road To Nowhere by Cy Wyss

Synopsis:

 

PJ Taylor, the feline shapeshifter, is back! Someone is kidnapping people’s pet cats and holding them for ransom. When PJ’s beloved niece is catnapped, the trail leads PJ to Nowhere, a tiny hamlet north of her hometown of Mayhap. What intrigues will PJ find among the inhabitants of this minuscule community? You can bet it involves at least one person up to no good and flushing this person out could be…murder!

 

Book Details:

Genre: Cozy Mystery Published by: Nighttime Dog Press, LLC Publication Date: September 1, 2019 Number of Pages: 222 ASIN: B07WCHL75J Series: Eyeshine, 2 Purchase Links: Amazon, Goodreads  

Read an excerpt:

Robert Taylor entered the brownstone via the back door, closing it quietly behind himself. He was in a landing of pale green and gray with tan carpet and stairs leading upward and a sandwich board on the wall with office numbers. The woman he was looking for was in 303, two stories above him. He ascended the two flights, his heart leaden with reluctance. He considered himself a unicorn – someone special and rare. Not only was he smart and successful (head of his own one-man FBI office in Mayhap, Indiana), the women in his family had the unusual proclivity to turn into cats when the sun set. This made them particularly effective operatives, although in fearing for their safety he often restricted their usefulness. His sister, PJ, had been his most important informant up until her recent death. He couldn’t believe she was gone. It didn’t seem real. Didn’t cats have nine lives? He somehow expected PJ to rise from her grave and come back to him. Instead, here he was, about to attempt to convince a psychotherapist of his sanity in the face of his recent tragedies. All he wanted was to get back to work. They wouldn’t let him back without the sign-off from this woman, Ms. Julia Herzenberg. Her name conjured images of some ancient Freudian presence, maybe someone who looked like Dear Abby or Ruth Bader-Ginsberg, with copious wrinkles and a severe bun. He shivered at the idea of exposing his inner life to this person. On the third floor, the stairwell opened into a larger space of muted pastels that smelled of rose and mint. Three doors greeted him, and he pushed through the one whose frosted glass proclaimed it 303. Inside, soft new age music played, and the floral scent was stronger. The culprit was an incense burner on a small table near the door. Thin smoke wafted from a glazed, bulbous pot in gray ombre. The walls of the suite were a soothing blue and the furniture worn leather in earthy browns. Striped pillows and throw blankets abounded, and health magazines lined the coffee table. Robert perched on the edge of a fat armchair and crossed his legs, interlacing his fingers around his knee. He waited, with the demeanor of a man about to face something dire and unwanted. His first impression of Julia Herzenberg when she opened the inner door was that she looked nothing like an old psychiatrist or supreme court judge. Her hair flowed around her head in generous curls, spilling from her shoulders in waves of auburn silk. Her eyes were a crystalline green the likes of which he had only seen previously on actresses or fashion models. She was tall and thin, with slender, manicured fingers and long legs beneath a plaid wool skirt. She reminded him of a willow – inscrutable and eternal, with Nature’s grace and strength. “Robert Taylor?” she asked. It took him a moment to shut his flapping mouth and recover his aplomb. “Yes,” he finally said, extending his hand. She shook it firmly, her hand warm and dry. She led him into a brown hallway, and to an office at one end. The room contained the same homey furniture as the waiting area, in neutral shades of soft leather with woven and plush accompaniments. “Have a seat,” she said. He stared at the wide couch before him. “Do I need to lie down?” he asked. “Only if you want to,” she said. She sat in an armchair across from the couch with her knees pressed together and her hands folded in her lap. She studied him, an entirely unassuming expression on her porcelain face. Awkwardly, he perched on the edge of the couch and rested his weight on his elbows on his thighs. He let his hands dangle. She remained still and silent as he took in his surroundings. The paintings on the walls were interesting but not distracting and consisted of abstractions that reminded him of natural surroundings. The lights were incandescent, and the shades partially drawn, rendering the space as comforting as a forest nook where sunlight filtered through the branches above. Dr. Herzenberg even had a small fountain on one side table and the faint sound of running water complemented the illusion. Robert could feel his tension recede, despite his natural wariness and dark mood. Still, she said nothing. Robert felt her watching him and found he couldn’t meet her gaze directly. Rather, his eyes roved over their environment, never settling for more than a few seconds. Behind and beside her was a narrow bookcase with glass panels and something about it bothered him. He kept returning to it, until he realized why. On the very top of the bookcase was an old-fashioned globe and a statue that looked like a very realistic black cat. It could have been PJ. He stared at the cat, and almost jumped out of his seat when the statue blinked. “God, that’s a cat!” he said. Dr. Herzenberg smiled. “That’s Bella.” “Wow,” Robert said. “I thought she was a statue.” “She likes to sit up there,” Dr. Herzenberg said. “Many of my patients don’t ever notice her.” “I’m amazed. You bring your cat with you to the office?” Dr. Herzenberg shrugged. “She doesn’t like to be alone.” “You could get her a companion.” “She doesn’t like other cats.” Robert chuckled. “Typical difficult feline.” “Tell me,” Dr. Herzenberg said. “Are you a cat person?” He remembered his sister, and the fact he’d never see her again. His eyes burned, though he willed himself not to tear up. “You could say that,” he said. PJ had turned into a cat every night since shortly after she had hit puberty. He still remembered the first time she’d shapeshifted. He was a rookie cop at the time and looking after her since their parents had died, as her much older brother and legal guardian. They’d been playing video games on the couch when she howled and writhed in pain. He had thought she was dying and called 911. Imagine his chagrin when they arrived and found no sign of the girl that he’d insisted needed an ambulance. Instead, a black tabby cat watched him explain that he’d had a nightmare and called emergency services by mistake. His colleagues ribbed him for weeks afterward. Robert was so traumatized, he confined PJ to her room after sundown from that time forward, and he somehow managed to convince himself her transition hadn’t happened. It was only recently, with his own daughter, Nancy, entering puberty, that he’d finally opened up to PJ about her wonderous ability. He had been terrified that Nancy would become a shapeshifter as well. Be the status of that as it may, at least one outcome had been that he had become significantly closer to PJ, a relationship long overdue. His memories of PJ ran through his mind, and guilt stabbed his heart. If only he hadn’t been so pigheaded, he could have showed his love for her sooner. He could have had years of closeness instead of mere months. They could even, perhaps, have– No. He wouldn’t let himself think about that. Regret was a demon that ate you alive. It was what it was. He couldn’t change the past any more than he could draw castles in the sky. “What are you thinking about?” Dr. Herzenberg asked. Robert blinked several times, his reverie broken. “Nothing,” he said. She stared at him. His gaze dropped to the coffee table between them. “I was thinking of my sister,” he said. “Tell me about her.” Robert took a deep breath and let it out slowly. He crossed his arms over his chest and studied the carpet under their feet, a confetti-patterned collage of woodland hues. He found himself telling Dr. Herzenberg the truth – something he hadn’t done in decades. “She’s not actually my sister,” he said. “Oh?” She raised a delicate eyebrow. “Well, she wasn’t, I mean,” he said. “My father was her mother’s cousin.” Dr. Herzenberg appeared lost in thought for a moment. “So, your ‘sister’ was actually your second cousin?” “Yes,” Robert said. “Why do you call her your sister?” “Our parents married,” Robert said. “Legally, PJ was my sister.” “I see,” she said. Another wave of regret washed over Robert. He clasped his hands together and hung his head so she wouldn’t see the sheen of tears in his eyes. “I did read your employment record,” Dr. Herzenberg said. “You’ve had quite the last couple of weeks.” Robert snorted. “Yeah. You could say that.” “You failed the bureau’s lie detector test, separated from your wife, shot and killed a man, and your sister – your second-cousin, I mean – died. I’d say all of that qualifies you for a little paid leave.” Then there was the business with his daughter, which he couldn’t talk about, as well as the thing concerning his infidelity, which he likewise couldn’t bring himself to talk about. His shoulders drooped. “I don’t want paid leave,” he said. “I want to get back to work. All I do is sit around and mope. If I can work, I’ll feel better.” He looked up, into her concerned face. “What can I do to convince you I’m fit for returning to work – that, in fact, it’ll help me recover?” She tilted her head and scrutinized him. He fidgeted under the weight of those amazing green eyes. “You can’t run from your grief, Robert. Turning your attention elsewhere will only cause it to fester and grow into something uncontrolled.” He sighed. “I was afraid you’d say that.” On top of the bookcase, the cat stood and stretched elegantly, her back a deeply curved S. She sat on her haunches and used her paw to clean her snout. Robert watched, fascinated. “Tell me more about your sister,” Dr. Herzenberg said. Another wave of regret reminded Robert of his failures, and, with it, a twinge of fear piqued his soul. He’d already said too much. “You were close, I take it,” the psychiatrist said. “Yeah,” Robert said. Dr. Herzenberg waited. Robert looked around the room again, his gaze settling on the quarter-height of window, through which a gray fall sky was visible. “What bothers you most about her death?” she asked. Robert’s eyes lost their focus as his attention turned inward. Guilt weighed heavy in his heart as he remembered the past two weeks and his role in the whole mess. “I never…” He couldn’t bring himself to say it. Dr. Herzenberg perked up. “You never what?” He stared at the cat, who stared back unblinkingly. The odd sense of unreality overtook him again and he found himself speaking the truth once more. “I never told her how much I loved her,” he said. “I’m sure she knew,” Dr. Herzenberg said. Robert shook his head. “No. She didn’t.” “What makes you think that?” “I pushed her away. She wanted more from me. I should have given it to her.” Dr. Herzenberg’s brow furrowed and her eyes darkened. “What are we talking about, Robert? You’ve told me she wasn’t your blood sister. How did you see her? As your little sister? Or, as something more than that?” Robert ground his teeth. How did they get onto this topic? He was here to get back to work, not to get himself fired for inappropriate feelings toward PJ. “I shouldn’t have said it that way,” he said. “Of course, I meant it platonically.” She studied him. “You know that everything you tell me is confidential.” He frowned. “I know you have to report what I say to my superiors,” he said. “No,” she said. “I have to report my overall opinions. Your disclosures are entirely between us alone.” Robert stared up at Bella, whose golden gaze had never seemed to leave him. He was pretty sure the cat saw right through him, and he wondered how much of that ability Dr. Herzenberg had. He said nothing. *** Excerpt from Road To Nowhere by Cy Wyss. Copyright 2019 by Cy Wyss. Reproduced with permission from Cy Wyss. All rights reserved.

 

 

Author Bio:

Cy Wyss Cy Wyss is a writer based in Indianapolis, Indiana. They have a Ph.D. in computer science and their day job involves wrangling and analyzing genetic data. Cy is the author of three full-length novels as well as a collection of short stories and the owner and chief editor of Nighttime Dog Press, LLC. Before studying computer science, Cy obtained their undergraduate degree in mathematics and English literature as well as masters-level degrees in philosophy and artificial intelligence. They studied overseas for three years in the UK, although they never managed to develop a British accent. Cy currently resides in Indianapolis with their spouse, daughter, and two obstreperous but lovable felines. In addition to writing, they enjoy reading, cooking, and walking 5k races to benefit charity.

Catch Up With Cy Wyss On: cywyss.com, Goodreads, BookBub, Twitter, & Facebook!

 

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This is a rafflecopter giveaway hosted by Partners in Crime Virtual Book Tours for Cy Wyss. There will be 2 winners of one (1) Amazon.com Gift Card each. The giveaway begins on September 1, 2019 and runs through October 2, 2019. Void where prohibited.

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Moms With Secrets
Tammy & Lisa Mom Detectives Book 1
by Bena Roberts
Genre: Chick Lit , Cozy Mystery, Parenting Drama
Move over Thelma and Louise! Enter Tammy and Lisa two moms of troubled
teenage boys. Not convinced of the school’s ability to deal with
serious issues, the two mothers become mom detectives.
Meet Tammy Lewis – the local politician’s wife. She is a dutiful wife and
adores her family. Her life in her cozy village and Victorian home is
perfect.
Enter Lisa Evans – an enigmatic yoga teacher and single mother. Lisa has
worked hard to succeed in her life, and when she discovers her
teenage son might be dealing drugs, she comes up with a crafty plan.
Lisa sets out to frame innocent mom Tammy Lewis for her son’s
misdemeanors. Lisa’s son and Tammy’s son are best friends so; the
set-up could work.
Is Tammy the pushover that Lisa believes?
More importantly? Has the village school got the accusations right? Are
Mark and Ethan, Tammy & Lisa’s children really the local village
school drug lords?
Author Bena Roberts has delivered a warm and witty short read ideals for
mums with troubled teenage boys who understand the pull of
motherhood. How far would you go to protect your teenage son?
Bena Roberts was a journalist and analyst. Now she prefers the title
novelist and romance adventurist. She graduated in England 1994 and
then with a Masters in 1997.
Born in 1973, Bena lived in West London until she was 24. Then she lived
and worked in Budapest, Bruges, Prague, Amsterdam, Vienna, Hamburg
and Munich. She currently resides in Germany, between Heidelberg and
Frankfurt. Although she still refers to London as ‘home.’
Bena successfully created a technology blog which gained funding, had
lunch with Steve Ballmer and was ‘top 50 most influential woman in
mobile.’ Her blog also won several awards including Metro Best Blog.
Bena has two children, loves small dogs and always writes books with a cup of Earl
Grey.
Bena’s favorite literary style is black humor, and she hopes to offer a unique voice
in this area. Her books aim to confront the darkest of life
experiences, with levity. Most of her writing is heavy hitting yet
also entertaining. The second novel out in 2018 offers
thought-provoking fiction which embraces the absurd with reality.
Follow the tour HERE
for exclusive excerpts and a giveaway!

Book Details:

Book Title: ICE by Lauren Carr
Category: Adult fiction, 380 pages
Genre: Mystery, Crime Fiction, Police Procedural, Cozy
Publisher: Acorn Book Services
Release date: February 26, 2018
Tour dates: April 2 to 30, 2018
Content Rating: PG (It’s a murder mystery and there is mild violence. Very mild swearing no F-bombs. No on-stage sex scenes.)

Book Description:

The clues for a close-to-the-heart missing person’s case heat up when Chris Matheson starts chipping away at the ice on the cold case.

When Sandy Lipton and her unborn child disappear, the court of public opinion finds young Chris Matheson guilty. Decades later, the retired FBI agent returns home to discover that the cloud of suspicion cast over him and his family has never lifted. With the help of a team of fellow retired law enforcement officers, each a specialist in their own field of investigation, Chris Matheson starts chipping away at the ice on this cold case to uncover what had happened to Sandy and her baby and the clues are getting hot!

To read reviews, please visit Lauren Carr’s page on iRead Book Tours.

 

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Watch the Book Trailer:


Author Interview:

When did you begin writing ICE?  What inspired this book and how much research was involved in writing it?

To tell you the truth, I began writing ICE in 2007. Really! I’m a writer hoarder. I never throw anything away. When I finish a book and find a subplot that doesn’t work, I’ll cut and paste it into a “cut scenes” file. Well, after I had finished Twofer Murder at the end of summer 2017, I went hunting for a Mac Faraday mystery that I had started over a year ago to resume working on for my next project. Yet, I couldn’t remember the working title I had given it. (I still can’t remember the working title!) While hunting, I found an unpublished Joshua Thornton book. Sometimes, I will write a book and think it’s not quite there yet. When that happens, I’ll set it aside until I figure out what is wrong with it. In this case, the mystery plotline was there, but the detective, in this case Joshua Thornton, was wrong. The date on that file was 2007—ten years ago!

At the same time, I was mentally working on a new series—Chris Matheson, a recent FBI retiree who teams up with a group of law enforcement retirees, to work on those cold cases that keep them up at night. During the summer, I had seen a true crime documentary called The Keepers, about a group of former students investigating the murder of their teacher, a nun killed in the 70’s. Now in their fifties and sixties, they have pooled their talents to find out what happened to their teacher. As a writer, I thought, “What if…” it didn’t take much research to find that many police departments across the country now bring in retired detectives to work cold cases.

The mystery in the Joshua Thornton book was a cold case. In November 2017, I went to work on converting the Joshua Thornton book to a Chris Matheson Cold Case mystery.

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Give me a minute and let me look.

(pause)

Several.

Is writing a career you originally chose to pursue or was it something you did as a hobby?  If a hobby what career path did you take instead?

Writers are born to write. They’re storytellers. Yes, there are technical things that every writer must learn to succeed—like proper grammar and punctuation—but you have to be born a writer.

Here’s how you can spot a writer. Ask them a question. How’s your day? How did you meet your husband? Anyone who is not a writer will tell you “Fine” and “We met on a blind date.” End of conversation.

But a writer! She’ll grab you by the throat with a hook and then proceed to tell you in detail to include who, what, when, where, why, and how. A writer will establish characters, setting, motives, and include a beginning, middle, and end with a smashing climax about how her husband almost had a stroke the morning after the wedding when her mother revealed that she had offered to give them a down payment on a house if they had skipped a formal wedding and eloped instead.

Writers are always writing. Even if their day job is waiting tables or working as a stock broker, they are spinning tales in their minds. As a child, I remember rewriting the Bobbsey Twin mysteries to include a kidnapping or changing the mysterious sea shell on the beach to a dead body.

For many years, my mystery writing was a hobby while I did editing. I didn’t actually start writing mysteries full time until after I had my son in 1998—six months after giving up my writing career to be a stay-at-home mom.

Writing is what writers do—even if they aren’t able to make a career out of it.

What was the first book you ever wrote about and was it ever published?

My first book was what I call the Great American Catastrophe. It was before work processors. I was nineteen and locked myself up one summer and worked on it day and night on an electric typewriter. It used up two reams of paper. It was a murder mystery set in Hollywood. It was never published because I did not know who to send it to and since it was over 900 pages, it cost a fortune to copy and mail. It is now in a basement or attic some place.

How many hours a day do you write?

Time actually spent writing? An average of six hours a day. I spend my mornings taking care of business. I answer emails. Do my social media. Argue with my business manager aka husband. Then, after lunch, I will write until it is time to start cooking dinner. After dinner, I will write for three to four more hours until I go to bed.

Do you have any writing habits that people might find unusual?

I write where I land? I have a writer’s studio. But as soon as I sit down to start working on something, I hate to be interrupted. So I’ll remain wherever I happen to be when I started writing until I am forced to move.

That’s another thing—once I get started on a scene or section, I hate to be interrupted. If I’m in the middle of a shootout and someone gets shot, I need to continue working on it. Whereas, a friend of mine who is also a writer says she can leave her characters bleeding out for weeks because they aren’t real. Me? I can’t do that. I need to keep on working until everyone is out of immediate danger.

What are you currently working on?

I am working on two books that I expect to be released early summer and another this fall.

Look for the third Thorny Rose Mystery early this summer. Murder by Perfection.

Frustrated with their busy schedules, Murphy Thornton and Jessica Faraday attempt to find togetherness taking a couple’s gourmet cooking course at the Stepford Kitchen Studio, taught by Chef Natalie Stepford.

As if spending her date night cooking isn’t bad enough, Jessica is further annoyed when the beautiful, talented, successful businesswoman starts paying too much one-on-one time with Murphy. When Natalie ends up dead, the Thorny Rose detectives find togetherness doing what they do best. As they peel back the layers of the Stepford marriage, they discover that the pursuit of perfection can be deadly.

But wait! There’s more! Look for a Mac Faraday Mystery this fall! The next installment in the Mac Faraday Mysteries will be coming out just in time for Christmas – A Murder for Christmas (working title).

About the Author:


Lauren Carr is the international best-selling author of the Mac Faraday, Lovers in Crime, and Thorny Rose Mysteries—over twenty titles across three fast-paced mystery series filled with twists and turns!
Now, Lauren has added one more hit series to her list with the Chris Matheson Cold Case Mysteries. Set in the quaint West Virginia town of Harpers Ferry, Ice introduces Chris Matheson, a retired FBI agent, who joins forces with other law enforcement retirees to heat up those cold cases that keep them up at night.
Book reviewers and readers alike rave about how Lauren Carr’s seamlessly crosses genres to include mystery, suspense, crime fiction, police procedurals, romance, and humor.
Lauren is a popular speaker who has made appearances at schools, youth groups, and on author panels at conventions. She lives with her husband, and three dogs on a mountain in Harpers Ferry, WV.
Connect with the author: Website ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ Instagram
 
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Ends May 5, 2018

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