Posts Tagged ‘nonfiction’

Our currently unsettling political environment fails to address urgent issues. This trend, unless reversed, will lead us to an impoverished future. Technology can either help all to thrive, or deprive most of their livelihoods.

Despite low unemployment, more than one in eight Americans lived in poverty in 2017.  Workers’ wages remain stagnant as the wealthiest prosper. Today’s best paying jobs are in technology companies that produce their products with far fewer workers than did yesterday’s factories.

In as few as ten years advances in artificial intelligence and robotics could eliminate jobs for all but the most highly trained. Now, once bustling factory towns, produce little besides poverty and opioid addiction. What will their future hold?

Our economic system fails to serve hard-working people whose anguish is muffled by a distracting Washington circus. How did this happen? Can we avoid calamity and restore the values that built our republic?

We Can Fix It: Reclaiming the American Dreamexamines the idea that the United States is founded on a vision of opportunities for all ambitious enough to pursue them. Much has changed since the days when land was readily available to farm and men could easily engage in their trades. In the early 1900s, Theodore Roosevelt and those who followed him stood up against monopolies and promoted workers’ concerns.

During the middle decades of the twentieth century, strong unions and high progressive taxes helped build a sturdy middle class. Today that middle class is endangered as the top 20 percent of Americans own nearly 90 percent of American wealth. Some economists predict that already extreme income inequality will be exacerbated by the the tax law passed in December 2017. Others predict that such an unequal economy cannot sustain itself. V. O. Diedlaff’s short book provides an overview of the problems facing Americans in the near future and offers possible solutions.

The eBook is currently free from Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and others. The introductory priced paperback edition is available at Amazon. The Kindle edition is available for pre-order before its summer release.

Discover more at V. O. Diedlaff’s website: http://diedlaffing.blogspot.com/

 

Non-Fiction – Memoir
Date Published: November, 2016
Publisher: Different Drummer Press
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Polio and Me provides a view of the past, present, and future—the saga of one boy’s pain, fear, and loneliness—the long struggle to develop a vaccine and effective treatments—the world-wide goal to eradicate the polio virus, and in some twenty-first century cancer research trials, the polio virus eliminated cancerous tumors.

 


Excerpt

Today, seventy-two years later, as a father of three, a grandfather, and great-grandfather, the idea that an ambulance team could walk into my doctor’s office and rip my son or daughter from my arms is an appalling notion. But this was 1943, decades ago, when polio epidemics killed and paralyzed an average of 12,000 children and adults each year.

I understand that having your child taken from your arms sounds draconian, but in Los Angeles, during the summer months of the annual polio epidemics, as many as one hundred patients a day were admitted to Los Angeles County Hospital. Once the patient’s illness was confirmed as polio, those patients were moved to the Communicable Disease Building where they would remain isolated until all possibility of passing on the polio virus to a non-infected person had ended.

And Los Angeles was not alone. Public health professionals throughout the country had learned to act swiftly because when it came to a polio pandemic, the end justified the means. So the abrupt actions of the Los Angeles ambulance crew may have seemed cruel, but the fear of polio, both real and exaggerated, caused even rational professionals to overreact. The moment any patient’s illness was thought to be polio, that patient would be rushed to an isolation facility where he or she would remain for weeks if not months.

One of the major reasons a diagnosis of polio was so frightening for my parents and the medical professionals alike, was that no one could predict the eventual outcome of a polio infection for an agonizingly long period of time. While I was in the Communicable Disease Building at the Los Angeles County Hospital, my parents struggled with a list of frightening questions without a way to learn the answers.

Would their son lose his ability to breathe and die in isolation?

Would their son spend the rest of his days living in an iron lung?

Would their son remain paralyzed?

Would their son recover some use of his limbs?

Looking back, those weeks apart were among the most traumatic days of my life. But during that summer of 1943, as the summers before, and the summers that followed, children with polio, and their parents, learned to endure.

About the Author
Ken Dalton was born in Los Angeles in 1938. In 1943 he contracted polio and spent the next eleven years of his childhood in and out of hospitals. Fifty-nine years ago he married his childhood sweetheart and is a father of three, a grandfather of four, and the great-grandfather of nine.
After a thirty-eight year management career with Pacific Telephone Company, Ken retired to write golf and travel articles for Golf Digest, Golf Illustrated, Fairways and Greens, and Golf.com.
During two NBC-TV Celebrity Golf Tournaments at Lake Tahoe, he interviewed Olympic Decathlon Champion, Bruce Jenner when he was Bruce, not Caitlyn, the mischievous Chicago Bears quarterback, Jim McMahon, the iconic Vice-President Dan Quail, and NBC Today show anchor, Matt Lauer.
Ken has published six mystery novels. Polio and Me marks his initial foray into the world of non-fiction. Presently, Ken is working on his seventh mystery, The Heretics Hymnal, and a comedy of manners novel, Casper Potts and the Ladies Casserole club.
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Book Details:

Book Title: Journey’s End: Death, Dying and the End of Life
Authors: Victoria Brewster & Julie Saeger Nierenberg
Category: Adult Non-Fiction; 558 pages
Genre: Resource/Educational
Publisher: Xlibris
Release date: July 20, 2017
Tour dates: Sept 4 to 22, 2017
Content Rating: PG-13 + M
Book Description:

In Journey’s End, we write about death, dying, and end of life issues. We attempt to define and describe these real-life circumstances, and we discuss ways to proactively deal with them. Multiple personal and professional perspectives provide valuable insights.

What is dying like for dying persons, for loved ones, and for those who lend support in the process? Each experience will have unique qualities. Everyone dies in his own way, on his own schedule. While we explore the dying process, we make no assumptions about how any particular death will unfold.

Grief and bereavement support, training tools, and educational resources are included.

 
Meet the Authors:

Victoria has a master of social work degree. She has worked as a case manager with older adults for the past seventeen years and as a group facilitator. Her past work experience was as a therapist with children and families, and as a case manager for adults with mental health issues. She just launched a consulting business, NorthernMSW to focus on end of life issues, planning, training, and advocacy, along with memoir writing and life legacy writing.

Julie was inspired equally by her professional backgrounds as a biomedical researcher and long time educator. Julie values open and lively discussions based on interview and research findings, trends in health and wellness, and exciting new modalities of treatment and professional education. She believes it will be through such discussions that we will create new and more satisfying cultural paradigms within which we may live all the days of our lives with dignity and quality of care.

Connect with the authors: Website ~ Facebook

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2 Copies up for grabs. Ends Sept 30.

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My Grandmother

by Victoria Brewster

My maternal grandmother-my memories of her are when I was older. I do not remember her from when I was young. She was a widow and supported my mother and uncle by herself. I never met my maternal grandfather.

I was nine when she moved to Florida, so what I remember of her is from then on. She went to Florida to help take care of my great-grandmother.

I have fond memories of​ visiting with her the summer I turned thirteen when I flew by myself to spend two weeks with her. It was a great vacation! I remember visiting the beach, buying milkshakes, and her teaching me about homeopathy.

My grandmother and I wrote each other often, and even as the years went by, we still wrote one another until she became very ill. We spoke by telephone for birthdays, holidays, and for Mother’s Day sent cards to each other.

When I married, she was unable to travel for the wedding so my (then) husband and I spent two days with her before we went on our honeymoon to show her our wedding video and to visit with her.

When her first great-granddaughter was born, I went with my parents to Florida so they could meet one another. A few months later, my husband at the time and I along with our daughter went down to Florida to say goodbye.

My grandmother was in hospice.

It was difficult, but something I had to do. I needed to see her and say goodbye.

She was buried in New York State when she had lived most of her life. I remember choosing a special poem to read at her funeral, but then the time came, I could not read it. I was too overwhelmed with grief and sadness. My brother ended up reading the poem.

I miss her, but I cherish the photograph that was taken when my oldest was eleven months old of four generations of females together, my grandmother, my mother, my daughter, and myself-memories not to be forgotten.